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Vol I No. 1
PBS News & Events

The Centenary of the Armistice ending The First World War, A Sermon Preached upon Remembrance Sunday

by William J. Martin

The Grosvenor Chapel

Mayfair

REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY

11th November 2018

Commemoration of the Centenary

of the Armistice ending the Great War

 

Requiem  (Setting by Gabriel Fauré)

With Choir and Orchestra Directed by Richard Hobson

The Service opened with the gathering in silence of the Congregation and the entry in procession of the Sacred Ministers and the laying of a wreath of Flanders Poppies to the recitation of the traditional words of Lawrence Binyon taken from his poem For the Fallen. It then being exactly 11 o’clock,  The Two Minute’s Silence began, as observed across the nation, in accord with the tradition started by King George V in 1919, to mark the 11thhour of the 11thday of the 11thMonth, when the Armistice which ended the First World War, signed in Compiegne, came into effect one hundred years ago. This silence ended with the sounding of the Last Post and the firing of the traditional 21 Gun Salute by the Kings Troop, The Royal Horse Artillery (using 13Pdr Field Guns they still use for State Gun Salutes that were first developed at the time of the Boer War and remained standard issue at the start of the First World War).

The National Anthem was sung whereafter the Choir sang the Introit and Kyrie.

FirstReading:                     Jonah3.1-5,10

SecondReading:                   “The Strange Meeting”   (APPENDED BELOW)

THE GOSPEL :                  Mark 1.14 – 20

THE SERMON

The Revd. Canon Alistair Macdonald-Radcliff

Words From “The Strange Meeting”:

“Strange friend,” I said, “here is no causeto mourn.”
“None,” said the other, “save the undone years,
The hopelessness. Whatever hope is yours,
Was my life also; I went hunting wild
After the wildest beauty in the world,
Which lies not calm in eyes, or braided hair,
But mocks the steady running of the hour,
And if it grieves, grieves richlier than here.

From the Gospel of St. Mark, 1,14:  Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God, and saying, ‘The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.’

In the name of God the Father,  Son and Holy Ghost…..

It was President Woodrow Wilson who made famous a phrase first forged by H.G. Wells[1]when he declared that the First World War “Is a war to end all wars” while adding brightly (in justification of his declaration of war on Germany), that it would also “make the world safe for democracy”.    In the event, after it was ended with the armistice we commemorate today, it was followed by what David Fromkin has aptly called (and used as the title of his book) A Peace to End All Peace,  or to put that another way “Only the dead have seen the end of war” as George Santayana observed in 1922[2](in a repost to Wilson). Thus, it could well be argued that much of world history ever since has been a series of footnotes to the First World War.

The Great War, as it was called at the time, was clearly an appalling calamity and we commemorate its end one hundred years ago with an intense ambivalence, for that ending was much celebrated in 1918, and yet we are also horrified by its human cost

While exact figures can be debated, estimates suggest that around 10 million military personnel died, and 7 million civilians, with 21 million wounded, and around 7.7 million missing  and/or imprisoned.[3]

The Second World War, which was in so many ways a legacy of the First, left something over 60 million people dead[4]with somewhere between 38 to 55 million civilians  killed, including 13 to 20 million from war-related disease and famine.

At the risk of blurring the hideousness of all this, amidst a blizzard of statistics, it is also worth recalling that the worldwide spread of the Communist movement  (which we may note was avowedly secular) that started during the World War I, after the seizure of the Winter Palace in St Petersburg in 1917, has claimed — as it moved across Russia and then China, Eastern Europe, Cuba, North Korea, Vietnam and Cambodia around 100 million lives, so far.[5]

So much then for World War I’s legacy of peace….But quite apart from the horrifying scale of the loss of life in the century that followed, there is too, another epochal aspect, which we are still seeing unfold,  and this is the impact on the place of Western Civilization in the world.

Strangely, I have never seen an analysis of the subsequent societal impact on Britain, Germany France and other European nations of losing so many of an entire generation of future leaders among those killed in the trenches of the Somme, but it has to have been of world historical import.[6]

In addition, we have also to recall that the series of missteps and disasters in the Middle East which ultimately led to  9/11 –the event that will probably come to be seen as marking the real beginning of the present century–  had their origins in the Post War settlement and collapse of the Ottoman Empire.

And yet there is still more that we commemorate today, more even than all those killed  and injured in the First and Second World Wars –hugely important and right though that commemoration is.

For we think too of other conflicts with complex histories. Thus I recall that Queen Victoria on one occasion only, in the course of her long reign, flatly refused to read part of a Queen’s Speech (the “Gracious Speech” as it is called in Westminster) which is at the heart of state openings of Parliament.   Her reason was that there was a reference in the offending text to Britain withdrawing from Afghanistan, an action she simply refused to countenance, however disastrous our first forays there had been. But then, as she wrote firmly in 1899, “We are not interested in the possibilities of defeat”[7].

Yet just that,  has in fact been an enduring challenge for every foreign power that has engaged with Afghanistan ever since, down to the present day.

So it is that we commemorate as well today, the 453 British Service men and women who died in the thirteen year period of Britain’s last military involvement in Afghanistan that ended with the lowering of the Union flag at Camp Bastion in Helmand Province in October 2014.

One of the men killed in Afghanistan,  understanding the deadly risks he faced in doing the work to which he was committed as a soldier (in the SAS) in that often deadly conflict,  wrote a precautionary letter to his family, to be read only in the event of his death, as so very sadly it later was.

His words are telling,

“Please trust me that no matter what the circumstances of my death,

no matter how fast, no matter how slow, I was strong, without fear and without pain.

My only suffering will be the realisation that I will not see my family and friends again.”

And then he added, clearly entirely assured of his own continuing reality through death in this life that:

“The thing you have to cope with is not the loss of my soul,

but the loss of my physical presence.”

It is, as ever, the particularities of the individual killed in war, when we come to know something of that person, which bring home to us the depth of the loss involved in every single case.

No matter how many millions die in conflicts, each life ended is a deeply moving loss, leaving in this world of our experience an irreplaceable void.

All of which brings out that the task before us in the face of such calamity is to search and to dwell upon the meaning.

And that is true perhaps especially when the circumstances seem, from the perspective we have here and now in this world, to be particularly hard.

Wilfred Owen, died in 1918 just days before the Armistice, and in so many other cases it is tempting to ask –after men died securing this or that single trench, or fortification, or were left stranded as in the case of the Dardanelles (the ancient Hellespont), or the Guardsmen aboard the Sir Galahad in the Falkland’s: what wasthe point?

In the case of Afghanistan very senior military figures ultimately resigned over what they saw sharply  as the scandal involved in sending out troops in the notorious SnatchLand-Rovers that could not negotiate the terrain and had almost no armour plating to stop the flying bullets…[8]

Yet, if anything, such bitter realities only sharpen the particular meaning and particular value that the example of sacrifice offered here presents.   The force of that sacrifice stands, regardless of the immediate context in which any serviceman  or woman’s life is taken.

By this I mean that the willingnessto offer the ultimate sacrifice of one’s life in service of the Sovereign and the Nation (and thereby the good).

The fact of that remarkable resolve is implicit from the start of all service in the armed forces–  and it challenges uniquely,  the shallow banalities which so much in contemporary culture offers us, by way of distraction from the vital question of what meaning our lives really have.  (Just as the lives of the martyrs and saints of the Church do also and those committed to the fulness of religious life.) Commitment at such a level is a life defining act that only makes sense within a particular world view and deeply held beliefs.

This also points to just why the near sacrifice by Abraham of Isaac is so powerful (an episode that the Lectionary sometimes presents on this day). That represents what for most of us must seem a near impossible level of faith and commitment –expressed in a willingness to sacrifice that which Abraham most valued, even if –at the last possible moment—that price did not have to be paid and Isaac was spared.

All of this also calls us to recognise the deep fact that ultimate meaning in our lives is always to be found in the other.  It is always outside the self – not in that ever more demanding ego which urges us always to put the self first — in a state of radically anarchic self-absorption–  which our culture seems ever more strongly to commend .[9] To give in and do that is of course to loseoneself – this illustrates the radically paradoxical nature of ultimate meaning in this life.

When I last had the privilege of preaching on a Remembrance Sunday here (in 2015) I ended by drawing attention to the insight of George Steiner’s argument (in the End of Tragedy) that true tragedy seems to require a universe of real —which is to say transcendent— meaning, which is why it is so plausible to argue that in a post-modern universe —where the possibility of such truly deep meaning is effectively denied— we arrive ultimately not merely with Fukuyama at the end of history but at the end of tragedy as well.

To make the point another way, “tragedy is that form of art which requires the intolerable burden of God’s presence”which is why George Steiner argued that true tragedy is now dead because “His shadow no longer falls upon us as it fell on Agamemnon, or Macbeth or Athalie”.

The metaphysical universe of Christianity thus (in yet another aspect of paradox) makes real the possibility of tragedy (in contrast to the utter meaninglessness and ultimate chaos of nihilism) even as it also points to the possibility, and further, the actuality, of a redeemed world that therefore escapes tragedy. (For the Christian, life can never in the end be tragic in the classical sense.)

Is there not also disclosed here,  a vital epistemic presupposition – which is made evident  by asking, “What must be the case in order to ground the possibility of ultimate meaning?” Does not coherence itself, depend upon a common apprehension of objective value to which we may communally appeal?   Without such a state of affairs language itself will not work. As the philosopher Bernard Williams observed, “Children learn language in many ways and in many different kinds of situation, but one essential way is that they hear sentences being used in situations in which those situations are plainly true.”[10]

Grant this, and it becomes clear that one consequence of the loss of any authority sufficiently transcendent to command a common allegiance is ultimately the loss of the possibility of sustaining a common discourse too – something we see all around us, despite the supposedly ever wider bounds of globalization.

The fallen whom we commemorate then today, stand thus with timeless importance for the possibility of transcendent meaning and the claim upon us of true good, over and above the passing fancies that can only ever be the stuff of mere human constructs

As Bernard Williams further observed, in the context of literature, “Authority accrues to possession of, or capacity for, truth of the high order that readers from Aristotle to Friedrich Nietzsche have associated with the books most worth reading” and it was Nietzsche who observed (in The Birth of Tragedy to which Steiner was responding)  that more specifically, “Poetry desires to be [. . .] the unvarnished expression of the truth” –a point that brings us in one step to the complex poem we have just heard by Wilfred Owen,  namely “The Strange Meeting”

That poem is an extraordinarily imagined dialogue between the two soldiers, set in a dream-like context that is in fact Hell. Yet, while enemies in war, one greets the other as a friend and the two become reconciled in the end: “Let us sleep now…” This poem is one with many layers to it and much technical sophistication[11], yet it is well established that Owen took both the title and the basic plot of “Strange Meeting” from his hero Shelley’s (misleadingly entitled) The Revolt of Islam[12],While that plot is changed and greatly shortened, it is recognizably the same core plot.

In Owen’s poem, the dreaming narrator echoes thus the character Laon in Shelley’s poem, and opens with a deeply strange vision/experience set in the underworld wherein he meets a shade who greets him,

‘With piteous recognition in fixed eyes,

Lifting distressful hands as if to bless.’

But what perhaps matters more are not the parallels of plot, but rather, Shelley’s conception of what the “true poet” is and does, for here again, the poem meets Shelley’s ideals where, for him,  one of the key functions of poetry is that it refines and immortalizes beauty. And so it is that, as “The Strange Meeting” expresses this, it shows itself “richlier” than in the real world, of our immediate experience and attains to a reality that is no longer subject to time and change, “But mocks the steady running of the hour”:

“Poetry thus makes immortal all that is best and most beautiful in the world; … Poetry redeems from decay the visitations of the divinity in man”       (as Shelley put it in, A Defence of Poetry 1051/2).

Even the fact that Owen’s dead poet makes prophetic statements, about what the world will be like after the war,  has  Shelley’s warrant, for part of Shelley’s argument in the Defence is concerned with his conviction that prophecy is an essential “attribute of poetry.”

The poet, “not only beholds intensely the present as it is, and discovers those laws according to which present things ought to be ordered, but beholds the future in the present,” which enables poets to “foreknow the true spirit of events” (Shelley 1026- 27).

Another informing principle is Shelley’s conception of empathy, the capacity for imaginative sympathy, as the human faculty out of which true poetry springs, and the one to which it is addressed,  for ultimately here, the great secret of morals is love; or a going out of our own nature, and an identification of ourselves with the beautiful, which exists in thought, action, or person, not our own. A man, to be greatly good, must imagine intensely and comprehensively; he must put himself in the place of another and of many others; the pains and pleasures of his species must become his own.

The great instrument of moral good is the imagination; and poetry administers to the effect by acting upon the cause. . . .

Poetry strengthens the faculty which is the organ of the moral nature of man, in the same manner as exercise strengthens a limb. (Shelley, op cit. 1032-33)

Here too is a key claim of Shelley that informs Owen’s work also, in identifying the central importance of “the sole law” of “Love” in his poem, saying that in it “There is no quarter given to Revenge, or Envy, or Prejudice. Love is celebrated every where as the sole law which should govern the moral world”.

To say all this is to forge for poetry a role of extraordinary grandeur and for the poet a unique vocation to speak of what is most true and real and thus enable us to grasp this too.  Such a perspective does much perhaps to explain why it is poetry that has become so powerful in shaping how we have grappled with both the horrors and the meaning of the Great War in particular, as it brings out with unique force the weight of meaning that attaches to the lives that were lost.

So too can it give new insight now for us into the weight of those famous words with which our service today began, before the two minute’s silence and the Last Post, written by Lawrence Binyon in For the Fallen, for

Death august and royal

Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres.

And it is because of the witness to important truths embodied in such sacrifice that we can truly say

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.

AMEN

Set out below (After the footnotes) are the portraits and names of the British men and women who died while fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan (Which for reasons particular to the Congregation at the Grosvenor Chapel were given prominence in this Service)

The full text of the Poem The Strange Meeting is placed as an Appendix

NOTES

[1]In an article entitled “The War That Will End War,” published in The Daily News on Aug. 14, 1914 and used three years later by Wilson.

[2]In his book Soliloquies in England and Later Soliloquies

[3]It is worth noting as Dan Snow has recently pointed out that an earlier conflict was possibly even more bloody namely that in southern China of the mid nineteenth century. Conservative estimates put the number dead in the 14-year Taiping rebellion as being between 20 million and 30 million.  In terms of percentage of the population killed,  the figure was 2% for Britain in WW1, and this was actually was half that suffered by the population during the Civil War when 4% of the population of England and Wales died, while an even higher proportion died in Scotland and Ireland. See,https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25776836. Again, re. WW1,  of the 6 million men mobilized in Britain 700,000 died which, as a proportion of those under arms, was in fact lower than  that of the Crimean War of 1853-56)

[4]Estimates range from 50-80 million

[5]“100 Years of Communism—and 100 Million Dead. The Bolshevik plague that began in Russia was the greatest catastrophe in human history”, David Satter, The Wall Street Journal, Nov. 6, 2017

[6]About 12% of the British army’s enlisted soldiers were killed during the war, but 17% of its officers. Eton alone lost more than 1,000 former pupils – amounting to 20% of those who served from that one school. The wartime Prime Minister Herbert Asquith lost a son, and the future Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law lost two. Anthony Eden lost twobrothers and another very severely wounded, and an uncle was captured.During the course of the was over 200 Generals were killed which reflects their close engagement in the conflict.

[7]December 1899 letter to Arthur Balfour during the “Black Week” of the Boer War, although, according to Lady Gwendolen Cecil, this was a verbal statement to Mr. Balfour in Windsor, as recorded in her biography of her Father, Life of Robert, marquis of Salisbury, volume 3 (1921). Another phrase that speaks to her personality of resolve, arose after being shot at by Roderick Maclean on 2 March 1882, when she observed that

“It is worth being shot at to see how much one is loved.” –quoted in Stanley Weintraub, Victoria. Biography of a queen(1987), p. 450.

[8]In another dark episode 14 RAF crew members died in the Nimrod XV230plane crash in September 2016 over Helmand,  that was later deemed to have been preventable by Charles Haddon-Cave QC, in his official 586-page report issued in 2004.

[9]To borrow a phrase of David Lyle Jeffrey in discussing Terry Eagleton, Can Faustus be Saved?

[10]See his Truth and Truthfulness, p.45. In the words of Alexander Prescott-Couch: Bernard Williams, in this work, “…seeks to defend the value of truth from so-called “deniers,” those who deny that truth plays an important role in our lives. For Williams, defending the value of truth involves defending the “virtues of truth,” that is, dispositions that lead one to acquire and espouse true beliefs. In Williams’s account, these dispositions are two: Sincerity and Accuracy.The former is the disposition to express what one believes when appropriate, while the latter is directed toward acquiring reliable information through carefully weighing evidence and avoiding self-deception and wishful thinking. Williams is concerned to define and defend these dispositions as well as show how agents can be motivated to manifest them.

[11]For example, Owen shows deft mastery of pararhyme, where the stressed vowels differ but the consonants are similar, and uses this technique throughout the poem – e.g. note the end words: escaped/scooped, groined/groaned, bestirred/stared. Again, while written in iambic pentameter overall, there are lines that vary and in doing so challenge the reader to alter the emphasis on certain words and phrases. (eg from lines 7, 27, and 30:

  • With pit / eous re /cognit / ion in / fixed eyes, (Where the first foot is iambic (non stress, stress ux), the second foot a pyrrhic (no stress, no stress, uu), the third another iamb, the fourth another pyrrhic and the fifth foot a spondee (stress, stress xx).
  • Or, dis / content, / boil blood / y, and / be (where rhe first foot is a trochee (stress, no stress, xu), the second is an iamb (no stress, stress ux), the third a spondee (stress,stress xx), the fourth an iamb (no stress, stress ux) and the fifth foot an iamb.
  • Courage / was mine, / and I / had mys / tery. (where again, a trochee ( inverted iamb) starts the line before the iambic beat takes over the rest.

The iambic pentameter reflects the steady almost conversational natural pace of speech, whilst the variations bring uncertainty, altered beats which echo battle and bring texture and added interest for the reader. (see Andrew Spacey, “Analysis of Poem “Strange Meeting” by Wilfred Owen”, in Owlcati

[12]Though another source of manifest influence was Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound  with its “Zoroasrtrian underworld of the unconscious ‘underneath the grave’…” (Alan Tomlinson, “Wilfred Owen and Shellley”, Studies in Romanticism, Vol. 32, No. 1, Spring, 1993. The ultimate and very grand claim of Shelley, to which Owen is heir is that that inspired poets can reveal deep truths to their readers, and those readers learn them through the imaginative “experience” that the act of reading confers (empathy) thus here,we are invited to the  recognition that to feel hatred, and to act upon it, both corrupt the spirit and creates enemies rather than eliminating them, a perspective this also ultimately one drawing upon our shared humanity.  In Shelley’s Prometheus a key moment of insight and transformation comes when he says (of his earlier curse of Jupiter) “It doth repent me: words are quick and vain;/Grief for a while is blind and so was mine./ I wish no living thing to suffer pain.

APPENDIX

“The Strange Meeting”:

By Wilfred Owen, 1893 – 1918

It seemed that out of the battle I escaped
Down some profound dull tunnel, long since scooped
Through granites which titanic wars had groined.
Yet also there encumbered sleepers groaned,
Too fast in thought or death to be bestirred.
Then, as I probed them, one sprang up, and stared
With piteous recognition in fixed eyes,
Lifting distressful hands as if to bless.
And by his smile, I knew that sullen hall,
By his dead smile I knew we stood in Hell.
With a thousand pains that vision’s face
was grained;
Yet no blood reached there from the upper ground,
And no guns thumped, or down the flues
made moan.
“Strange friend,” I said, “here is no cause
to mourn.”
“None,” said the other, “save the undone years,
The hopelessness. Whatever hope is yours,
Was my life also; I went hunting wild
After the wildest beauty in the world,
Which lies not calm in eyes, or braided hair,
But mocks the steady running of the hour,
And if it grieves, grieves richlier than here.
For by my glee might many men have laughed,
And of my weeping something had been left,
Which must die now. I mean the truth untold,
The pity of war, the pity war distilled.
Now men will go content with what we spoiled.
Or, discontent, boil bloody, and be spilled.
They will be swift with swiftness of the tigress,
None will break ranks, though nations trek
from progress.
Courage was mine, and I had mystery,
Wisdom was mine, and I had mastery;
To miss the march of this retreating world
Into vain citadels that are not walled.
Then, when much blood had clogged their
chariot-wheels
I would go up and wash them from sweet wells,
Even with truths that lie too deep for taint.
I would have poured my spirit without stint
But not through wounds; not on the cess of war.
Foreheads of men have bled where no
wounds were.
I am the enemy you killed, my friend.
I knew you in this dark; for so you frowned
Yesterday through me as you jabbed and killed.
I parried; but my hands were loath and cold.
Let us sleep now…”

The names of the men and women in the British Armed Services

who died while fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan follow:

Line 1Private Darren John George, from the Royal Anglian Regiment (silhouette), Corporal John Gregory of the Royal Logistic Corps, Sergeant Robert Busuttil of the Royal Logistic Corps, Private Jonathan Kitulagoda, the Rifle Volunteers, Lance Corporal Steven Sherwood, 1st Battalion, The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Light Infantry, Corporal Mark Cridge, 7 Signal Regiment, Lance Corporal Peter Edward Craddock, 1st Battalion The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment, Captain Jim Philippson, 7 Parachute Regiment Royal Horse Artillery, Sergeant Paul Bartlett, Royal Marines, Captain David Patten, of the Parachute Regiment.

Line 2Lance Corporal Jabron Hashmi, Intelligence Corps, Corporal Peter Thorpe, Royal Signals, Private Damien Jackson, 3rd Battalion the Parachute Regiment, Lance Corporal Ross Nicholls, Blues and Royals, Second Lieutenant Ralph Johnson, Household Cavalry Regiment, Captain Alex Eida, Royal Horse Artillery, Private Andrew Barrie Cutts, Air Assault Support Regiment, Royal Logistic Corps, Private Leigh Reeves, Royal Logistic Corps, Lance Corporal Sean Tansey, The Life Guards, Corporal Bryan James Budd, 3rd Battalion the Parachute Regiment, 29.

Line 3Lance Corporal Jonathan Peter Hetherington, 14 Signal Regiment (Electronic Warfare), Ranger Anare Draiva, 1 Royal Irish Regiment, Mne Joseph David Windall, Royal Marines, Corporal Oliver Simon Dicketts, the Parachute Regiment, Sergeant Gary Paul Quilliam, Sergeant John Joseph Langton, Sergeant Benjamin James Knight, Flight Sergeant Adrian Davies, Flight Sergeant Gerard Martin Bell, Flight Sergeant Stephen Beattie.

Line 4Flight Sergeant Gary Wayne Andrews, Flight Lieutenant Steven Swarbrick, Flight Lieutenant Allan James Squires, Flight Lieutenant Gareth Rodney Nicholas, Flight Lieutenant Leigh Anthony Mitchelmore, Flight Lieutenant Steven Johnson, Private Craig O’Donnell, The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 5th Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland, Corporal Mark William Wright, 3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, Lance Corporal Luke McCulloch, 1 Royal Irish Regiment, Lance Corporal Paul Muirhead, 1 Royal Irish Regiment.

Line 5Marine Gary Wright, 45 Commando Royal Marines, Marine Jonathan Wigley, 45 Commando Royal Marines, Marine Richard J Watson, 42 Commando Royal Marines, Lance Bombardier James Dwyer, 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, Marine Thomas Curry, 42 Commando Royal Marines, Lance Corporal Mathew Ford, 45 Commando Royal Marines, Marine Jonathan Holland, 45 Commando Royal Marines, Marine Scott Summers, 42 Commando Royal Marines, Lance Bombardier Ross Clark Lance Bombardier Liam McLaughlin.

Line 6Marine Benjamin Reddy, 42 Commando Royal Marines, WO2 Michael ‘Mick’ Smith, 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, Private Chris Gray, A Company, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, Guardsman Simon Davison, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Lance Corporal George Russell Davey, 1st Battalion the Royal Anglian Regiment, Guardsman Daniel Probyn, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Corporal Darren Bonner, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, Corporal Mike Gilyeat, Royal Military Police, Lance Corporal Paul “Sandy” Sandford, 1st Battalion The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters, Guardsman Neil ‘Tony’ Downes, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

Line 7Drummer Thomas Wright, 1st Battalion The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters, Captain Sean Dolan, of 1st Battalion The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters, Sergeant Dave Wilkinson, from 19 Regiment Royal Artillery, Guardsman Daryl Hickey 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Lance Corporal Alex Hawkins, of 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, Guardsman David Atherton, from the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Sergeant Barry Keen of 14 Signal Regiment, Lance Corporal Michael Jones, Private Tony Rawson, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, Captain David Hicks of 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment.

Line 8Private Aaron James McClure, Private Robert Graham Foster, and Private John Thrumble, all from the 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian, Senior Aircraftman Christopher Bridge from C flight, 51 Squadron RAF, Private Damian Wright, of 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Private Ben Ford, of 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Private Johan Botha from The 2nd Battalion of The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), Sergeant Craig Brelsford from The 2nd Battalion of the The Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters), Lance Corporal Ivano Violino from 20 Field Squadron, 36 Engineer Regiment, Colour Sergeant Phillip Newman of 4th Battalion The Mercian Regiment.

Line 9Private Brian Tunnicliffe of 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Major Alexis Roberts, 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Lance Corporal Jake Alderton of 36 Engineer Regiment, Captain John McDermid of The Royal Highland Fusiliers, Trooper Jack Sadler of The Honourable Artillery Company, Sergeant Lee Johnson of 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Corporal Darryl Gardiner of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Corporal Damian Stephen Lawrence of the 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Royal Marine Corporal Damian Mulvihill, Marine David ‘Dave’ Marsh of 40 Commando Royal Marines.

Line 10Lieutenant John ‘JT’ Thornton of 40 Commando Royal Marines, Senior Aircraftman Graham Livingston of the Royal Air Force Regiment, Senior Aircraftman Gary Thompson of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, Trooper Robert Pearson of the Queen’s Royal Lancers, Trooper Ratu Babakobau of the Household Cavalry Regiment, James Thompson (no more details given), Dale Gostick, of 3 Troop Armoured Support Company, Royal Marines, Private Charles Murray of 2nd Battalion, the Parachute Regiment (2PARA), Private Daniel Gamble of 2nd Battalion, the Parachute Regiment (2PARA), Private Nathan Cuthbertson of 2nd Battalion, the Parachute Regiment (2PARA).

Line 11Lance Corporal James Bateman, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment (2 Para), Private Jeff Doherty, of 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment (2 Para), Corporal Sean Robert Reeve of the Royal Signals, Paul Stout, Corporal Sarah Bryant of the Intelligence Corps, Lance Corporal Richard Larkin, Warrant Officer Class 2 Michael Williams of 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment (2 PARA), Private Joe Whittaker, Warrant Officer Dan Shirley, Lance Corporal James Johnson, B Company, 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Line 12Corporal Jason Stuart Barnes from the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Lance Corporal Kenneth Michael Rowe of the Royal Army Veterinary Corps, Sergeant Jonathan William Mathews of The Highlanders, 4th Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland, Private Peter Cowton from 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, Signaller Wayne Bland, Signal Regiment, Corporal Barry Dempsey The Royal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland, Ranger Justin James Cupples, 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment, Warrant Officer Class 2 Gary O’Donnell GM, 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment Royal Logistic, Private Jason Lee Rawstron of 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, Lance Corporal Nicky Mason, a soldier from 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment.

Line 13Trooper James Munday from D Squadron, the Household Cavalry Regiment, Rifleman Yubraj Rai of the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Royal Marine Neil Dunstan, Royal Marine Robert McKibben, Nepalese Gurkha Colour Sergeant Krishnabahadur Dura, Marine Alexander Lucas, 45 Commando Royal Marines, Marine Georgie Sparks, Marine Tony Evans, Corporal Marc Birch, Sergeant John Manuel.

Line 14Marine Damian Davies, Lance Corporal Steven ‘Jamie’ Fellows from 45 Commando Royal Marines, Lieutenant Aaron Lewis from 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery, Rifleman Stuart Nash from 1st Battalion The Rifles, Corporal Robert Deering from the Commando Logistic Regiment Royal Marines, Lance Corporal Benjamin Whatley, 42 Commando Royal Marines, Corporal Liam Elms, 45 Commando Royal Marines, Serjeant Chris Reed of 6th Battalion The Rifles, Marine Travis Mackin of Communications Squadron, United Kingdom Landing Force Command Support Group (UKLFCSG), Captain Tom Sawyer, 29 Commando Regiment Royal Artillery.

Line 15Corporal Danny Winter, 45 Commando Royal Marines, Acting Corporal Richard ‘Robbo’ Robinson, 1st Battalion the Rifles, Corporal Daniel ‘Danny’ Nield, 1st Battalion, The Rifles, Marine Darren Smith, 45 Commando, Lance Corporal Stephen Kingscott of 1st Battalion The Rifles, Rifleman Jamie Gunn from 1st Battalion The Rifles, Lance Corporal Paul Upton from 1st Battalion The Rifles, Corporal Tom Gaden, from 1st Battalion The Rifles, Marine Michael Laski, from 45 Commando Royal Marines, and Lance Corporal Christopher Harkett, from 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh.

Line 16Corporal Graeme Stiff of 1st The Queen’s Dragoon Guards, Corporal Dean John, member of the Light Aid Detachment of 1st The Queen’s Dragoon Guards, Lance Sergeant Tobie Fasfous, of 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, Corporal Sean Connor Binnie, from the 3 Scots ‘C’ Company Royal Regiment of Scotland, Rifleman Adrian Sheldon, from 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Sergeant Ben Ross, from 173 Provost Company, 3rd Regiment, Corporal Kumar Pun, from the 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Lieutenant Mark Evison, of the 1st Battalion, The Welsh Guards, Marine Jason Mackie, of Armoured Support Group, Royal Marines, and Fusilier Petero ‘Pat’ Suesue, of the 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

Line 17Sapper Jordan Rossi of 38 Engineer Regiment, Lance Corporal Robert Martin Richards from Armoured Support Group Royal Marines, Lance Corporal Kieron Hill from 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Lance Corporal Nigel Moffett, of the Light Dragoons, Corporal Stephen Bolger, of 1 Para, Rifleman Cyrus Thatcher, of 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Private Robert McLaren, from The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, Lieutenant Paul Mervis of 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Major Sean Birchall of 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, Lieutenant Colonel Rupert Thorneloe MBE, Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards.

Line 18Trooper Joshua Hammond of the 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, Lance Corporal David Dennis, from The Light Dragoons, Private Robert Laws, from 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Lance Corporal Dane Elson from the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, Captain Ben Babington-Browne, from 22 Engineer Regiment, Royal Engineers, Trooper Christopher Whiteside, The Light Dragoons, aged 20 from Blackpool, Rifleman Daniel Hume of the 4th Battalion The Rifles, Private John Brackpool of the Prince of Wales’ Company, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, Corporal Lee Scott of The 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, Rifleman Daniel Simpson of 2nd Battalion The Rifles.

Line 19Rifleman Joseph Murphy of 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Rifleman James Backhouse of 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Rifleman William Aldridge of 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Corporal Jonathan Horne of 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Rifleman Aminiasi Toge, of 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Corporal Joseph Etchells, of 2nd Battalion the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, Captain Daniel Shepherd from 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment, Guardsman Christopher King, of 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, The Royal Logistic Corps, Bombardier Craig Hopson from 40th Regiment Royal Artillery, Warrant Officer Class 2 Sean Upton from 5th Regiment Royal Artillery;

Line 20Trooper Phillip Lawrence from The Light Dragoons, Craftsman Anthony Lombardi from the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME), attached to The Light Dragoons, Corporal Kevin Mulligan from the Parachute Regiment, Lance Corporal Dale Thomas Hopkins from the Parachute Regiment, Private Kyle Adams from the Parachute Regiment, Private Jason George Williams, from The 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Lance Bombardier Matthew Hatton from 40th Regiment Royal Artillery, Rifleman Daniel Wild from 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Captain Mark Hale from 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Private Richard Hunt of 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh.

Line 21Sergeant Simon Valentine of 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, Lance Corporal James Fullarton of 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, Fusilier Simon Annis of 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, Fusilier Louis Carter of 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment, Fusiliers, Private Jonathan Young of 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment (Duke of Wellington’s), Serjeant Paul McAleese of 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Fusilier Shaun Bush from 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, Sergeant Lee Andrew Houltram of the Royal Marines, Sergeant Stuart Millar of The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, Private Kevin Elliott of The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Line 22Lance Corporal Richard James Brandon of the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Private Gavin Elliott of 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Corporal John Harrison from the Parachute Regiment, Kingsman Jason Dunn-Bridgeman from 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, Trooper Brett Hall from 2nd Royal Tank Regiment, Acting Serjeant Stuart McGrath from 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Corporal Michael Lockett from the 2nd Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Private James Prosser from 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh, Acting Corporal Marcin Wojtak of the Royal Air Force Regiment, Guardsman Jamie Janes, from the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

Line 23Lance Corporal James Hill of 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, Corporal James Oakland of the Royal Military Police, Corporal Thomas ‘Tam’ Mason from The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland (3 SCOTS), Staff Sergeant Olaf Sean George Schmid, of the Royal Logistic Corps, Corporal Nicholas Webster-Smith of the Royal Military Police, Corporal Steven Boote of the Royal Military Police, Guardsman James Major of 1st Battalion The Grenadier Guards, Sergeant Matthew Telford of 1st Battalion The Grenadier Guards, Warrant Officer Class 1 Darren Chant of 1st Battalion The Grenadier Guards, Serjeant Phillip Scott of 3rd Battalion The Rifles.

Line 24Rifleman Philip Allen, from 2nd Battalion the Rifles, Rifleman Samuel John Bassett, of the 1 Platoon, A Company, 4th Battalion The Rifles, Rifleman Andrew Ian Fentiman from 7th Battalion The Rifles, Corporal Loren Owen Christopher Marlton-Thomas from 33 Engineer Regiment, Sergeant Robert David Loughran-Dickson of the Royal Military Police, Sergeant John Amer, from 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, Lance Corporal Adam Drane, from 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, Lance Corporal David Leslie Kirkness from 3rd Battalion The Rifles, Rifleman James Stephen Brown, from 3rd Battalion The Rifles, Corporal Simon Hornby, from 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment.

Line 25Lance Corporal Michael David Pritchard of the 4th Regiment, Royal Military Police, Lance Corporal Christopher Roney of A Company, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, Lance Corporal Tommy Brown from The Parachute Regiment, Rifleman Aidan Howell, from 3rd Battalion, The Rifles, Sapper David Watson of 33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), Royal Engineers, Private Robert Hayes, of 1st Battalion the Royal Anglian Regiment, Captain Daniel Read of 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment, the Royal Logistic Corps, Corporal Lee Brownson from 3rd Battalion, the Rifles, Rifleman Luke Farmer from 3rd Battalion, the Rifles, Rifleman Peter Aldridge, of A Company 4 Rifles.

Line 26Lance Corporal Daniel Cooper from 3 RIFLES, Corporal Liam Riley from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Lance Corporal Graham Shaw from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Corporal John Moore from The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland (1 SCOTS), part of the 3 RIFLES Battle Group, Private Sean McDonald from The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland (1 SCOTS), part of the 3 RIFLES Battle Group, Warrant Officer Class 2 David Markland from 36 Engineer Regiment, Lance Corporal Darren Hicks from 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, Lance Sergeant Dave Greenhalgh, from 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Rifleman Mark Marshall from 6th Battalion, The Rifles, Kingsman Sean Dawson from 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment.

Line 27Sapper Guy Mellors of the 36 Engineer Regiment, Lieutenant Douglas Dalzell of 1st Battalion The Coldstream Guards, Lance Sergeant David Walker of 1st Battalion Scots Guards, Senior Aircraftman Luke Southgate, II Squadron Royal Air Force Regiment, Rifleman Martin Kinggett of A Company, 4th Battalion The Rifles, Sergeant Paul Maurice Fox, of 28 Engineer Regiment, Rifleman Carlo Apolis of 4th Battalion The Rifles, Corporal Richard Green from 3rd Battalion The Rifles, Rifleman Jonathon Allott of 3rd Battalion The Rifles, Rifleman Liam Maughan of 3rd Battalion The Rifles.

Line 28Lance Corporal Tom Keogh from 4th Battalion The Rifles, Corporal Stephen Thompson, from 1st Battalion The Rifles, Captain Martin Driver, from 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, Private James Grigg, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, Lance Corporal Scott Hardy, 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, Serjeant Steven Campbell, from A Company, 3rd Battalion The Rifles, serving as part of the 3 RIFLES Battle Group, Lance Corporal of Horse Jonathan Woodgate, from the Household Cavalry Regiment, Rifleman Daniel Holkham, from 3rd Battalion The Rifles, Guardsman Michael Sweeney from 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, Rifleman Mark Turner, from 3rd Battalion The Rifles.

Line 29Fusilier Jonathan Burgess, from 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh, Corporal Harvey Holmes from 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, serving with 40 Commando Royal Marines Battle Group, Lance Corporal Barry Buxton of 21 Engineer Regiment, Sapper Daryn Roy of 21 Engineer Regiment, Corporal Christopher Lewis Harrison, of B Company, 40 Commando, Royal Marines, Corporal Stephen Walker, of A Company, 40 Commando, Royal Marines, Gunner Zac Cusack of 4th Regiment Royal Artillery, Corporal Stephen Curley of 40 Commando Royal Marines, Scott Gregory Taylor, of Alpha Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines, Marine Anthony Dean Hotine, from Alpha Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines.

Line 30Corporal Terry Webster of 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Lance Corporal Alan Cochran of 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Lance Bombadier Mark Chandler from 3rd Regiment Royal Horse Artillery, Private Jonathan Michael Monk, 2nd Battalion The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, attached to 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Lance Corporal Andrew Breeze of 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Marine Steven James Birdsall from Bravo Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines, Corporal Taniela Tolevu Rogoiruwai from 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment (1 LANCS), Kingsman Ponipate Tagitaginimoce from 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment (1 LANCS), Trooper Ashley Smith from The Royal Dragoon Guards, Marine Richard Hollington, from 40 Commando.

Line 31Marine Paul Warren from Charlie Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines, Lance Corporal Michael Taylor from Charlie Company, 40 Commando Royal Marines, Sergeant Steven Darbyshire from 40 Commando Royal Marines, Private Alex Isaac from 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Private Douglas Niall Halliday from 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Lance Corporal David Andrew Ramsden from 1st Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Colour Sergeant Martyn Simon Horton from 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Bombardier Stephen Raymond Gilbert from 4th Regiment Royal Artillery, Corporal Jamie Kirkpatrick from 101 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) and Corporal Seth Stephens from the Royal Marines.

Line 32Trooper James Anthony Leverett of The Royal Dragoon Guards, Private Thomas Sephton of 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Bombardier Samuel Robinson from 5th Regiment Royal Artillery, Marine David Charles Hart from 40 Commando Royal Marines, Corporal Arjun Purja Pun from 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Lieutenant Neal Turkington from 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Major James Joshua Bowman from 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Marine Matthew Harrison from 40 Commando Royal Marines, Marine Jonathan Crookes from 40 Commando Royal Marines and Senior Aircraftman Kinikki Griffiths from the RAF Regiment.

Line 33Sergeant David Monkhouse from The Royal Dragoon Guards, Staff Sergeant Brett George Linley from 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment, Lance Corporal Stephen Daniel Monkhouse from 1st Battalion Scots Guards, Corporal Matthew James Stenton from the Royal Dragoon Guards, Sapper Mark Antony Smith, from 36 Engineer Regiment, Lance Sergeant Dale Alanzo McCallum of 1st Battalion Scots Guards, Marine Adam Brown from 40 Commando Royal Marines, Lieutenant John Sanderson, of 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Rifleman Remand Kulung of 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, and Sapper Darren Foster of 21 Engineer Regiment.

Line 34Sapper Ishwor Gurung of 69 Gurkha Field Squadron, 21 Engineer Regiment Group, Lance Corporal Jordan Bancroft, 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, Lance Corporal Joseph Pool, The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, Captain Andrew Griffiths, 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, Kingsman Darren Deady from the 2nd Battalion, The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, Trooper Andrew Howarth from The Queen’s Royal Lancers, Sergeant Andrew Jones of The Royal Engineers, Corporal Matthew Thomas from the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, Rifleman Suraj Gurung, from the 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Sergeant Peter Rayner from 2nd Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment.

Line 35Acting Corporal David Barnsdale from 33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), Sapper William Bernard Blanchard from 101 (City of London ) Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), Senior Aircraftman Scott Hughes, Ranger Aaron McCormick of The Royal Irish Regiment, Guardsman Christopher Davies, from the 1st Battalion Irish Guards, Private John Howard, 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, Corporal Steven Thomas Dunn, 216 (Parachute) Signal Squadron, Warrant Officer Class 2 Charlie Wood from 23 Pioneer Regiment, Royal Logistic Corps, Private Joseva Saqanagonedau Vatubua from The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland (5 SCOTS) and Private Martin Simon George Bell from 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment.

Line 36Ranger David Dalzell, from 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment, Warrant Officer Class 2 (Company Sergeant Major) Colin Beckett of 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, Private Conrad Lewis from 4th Battalion The Parachute Regiment, Private Lewis Hendry from 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, Lance Corporal Kyle Cleet Marshall of 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, Private Dean Hutchinson of the Royal Logistic Corps (RLC), Private Robert Wood of the Royal Logistic Corps (RLC), Lance Corporal Liam Richard Tasker of the Royal Army Veterinary Corps, Lance Corporal Stephen McKee of 1st Battalion The Royal Irish Regiment and Private Daniel Steven Prior of 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment.

Line 37Lance Sergeant Mark Terence Burgan from 1st Battalion Irish Guards, Major Matthew James Collins from 1st Battalion Irish Guards, Colour Sergeant Alan Cameron (Senior) from 1st Battalion Scots Guards, Captain Lisa Jade Head from 321 Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Squadron,11 EOD Regiment RLC, Marine Nigel Dean Mead from Lima Company, 42 Commando Royal Marines, Colour Serjeant Kevin Charles Fortuna A Company, 1st Battalion The Rifles, Lieutenant Oliver Richard Augustin Juliet Company, 42 Commando Royal Marines, Marine Samuel Giles William Alexander MC from Mike Company, 42 Commando Royal Marines, Corporal Michael John Pike, The Highlanders, 4th Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland and Lance Corporal Martin Joseph Gill, 42 Commando Royal Marines.

Line 38Rifleman Martin Jon Lamb from 1st Battalion The Rifles, Craftsman Andrew Found from The Corps Of Royal Electrical And Mechanical Engineers, Corporal Lloyd Newell from The Parachute Regiment, Private Gareth Leslie William Bellingham, from 3rd Battalion The Mercian Regiment (Staffords), Highlander Scott McLaren, of 4th Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Scotland (4 SCOTS), Lance Corporal Paul Watkins of the 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales’s), Corporal Mark Anthony Palin from 1st Battalion The Rifles, Marine James Wright, from Juliet Company, 42 Commando, Lieutenant Daniel John Clack of 1st Battalion The Rifles, (1 RIFLES), Royal Marine Sergeant Barry Weston from 42 Commando Royal Marines.

Line 39Lance Corporal Jonathan James McKinlay of The First Battalion The Rifles, Marine David Fairbrother, 24, from 42 Commando, Rifleman Vijay Rai from 2nd Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Private Matthew Haseldin, 21, from 2nd Battalion, The Mercian Regiment, Private Matthew Thornton, from 4th Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment (4 YORKS), Lance Corporal Peter Eustace, from 2nd Battalion The Rifles, Lance Corporal Richard Scanlon, 1st The Queen’s Dragoon Guards, Lieutenant David Boyce, 1st The Queen’s Dragoon Guards, Private Thomas Lake, from 1st Battalion The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, Rifleman Sheldon Steel, 20, from 5th Battalion The Rifles (5 RIFLES).

Line 40Sapper Elijah Bond of 35 Engineer Regiment, Royal Engineers, Captain Tom Jennings, Royal Marines, Squadron Leader Anthony Downing, RAF, Private John King, 19, of 1st Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Rifleman Sachin Limbu, 1st Battalion, The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Signaller Ian Sartorius-Jones from 20th Armoured Brigade Headquarters and Signal Squadron (200), Lance Corporal Gajbahadur Gurung from the Royal Gurkha Rifles, Senior Aircraftman Ryan Tomlin, of 2 Squadron, Royal Air Force Regiment, Sergeant Nigel Coupe, from 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, Corporal Jake Hartley from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment.

Line 41Private Anthony Frampton from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Private Christopher Kershaw from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Private Daniel Wade from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Private Daniel Wilford from 3rd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment, Captain Rupert Bowers, from the 2nd Battalion, The Mercian Regiment, Sergeant Luke Taylor, of the Royal Marines, Lance Corporal Michael Foley, of the Adjutant General’s Corps (Staff and Personnel Support), Corporal Jack Leslie Stanley, from The Queen’s Royal Hussars (The Queen’s Own and Royal Irish), Sapper Connor Ray, 33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), Guardsman Michael Roland from the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

Line 42Corporal Andrew Steven Roberts from 23 Pioneer Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps, Private Ratu Manasa Silibaravi from 23 Pioneer Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps, Lance Corporal Lee Thomas Davies from 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, Corporal Brent John McCarthy from Royal Air Force, Captain Stephen James Healey, 29, of 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh (The Royal Welch Fusiliers), Corporal Michael John Thacker, from 1st Battalion, The Royal Welsh, Private Gregg Thomas Stone, from 3rd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment, Lance Corporal James Ashworth from the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Corporal Alex Guy of the 1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment, Warrant Officer Leonard Perran Thomas of the Royal Corps of Signals.

Line 43Guardsman Craig Andrew Roderick of the 1st Battalion the Welsh Guards, Guardsman Apete Saunikalou Ratumaiyale Tuisovurua of the 1st Battalion the Welsh Guards, Lieutenant Andrew Robert Chesterman of the 3rd Battalion The Rifles, Lance Corporal Matthew David Smith of the Corps of Royal Engineers, Guardsman Jamie Shadrake of the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Guardsman Karl Whittle of 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Sergeant Lee Paul Davidson, The Light Dragoons, Lance Corporal Duane Groom, The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, Sergeant Gareth Thursby 3rd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment, Private Thomas Wroe, 3rd Battalion, The Yorkshire Regiment.

Line 44Sergeant Jonathan Eric Kups of the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME), Captain James Anthony Townley from the Corps of Royal Engineers, Captain Carl Manley of the Royal Marines, Corporal Channing Day from 3 Medical Regiment, Corporal David O’Connor from 40 Commando Royal Marines, Lance Corporal Siddhanta Kunwar of 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Lieutenant Edward Drummond-Baxter of 1st Battalion The Royal Gurkha Rifles, Captain Walter Barrie from The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, Sapper Richard Reginald Walker from 28 Engineer Regiment, Kingsman David Robert Shaw from 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment.

Line 45Lance Corporal Jamie Webb from 1st Battalion The Mercian Regiment, Private Robert Hetherington from 7th Battalion The Royal Regiment Of Scotland (7 SCOTS), Fusilier Samuel Flint from 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment Of Scotland (2 SCOTS), Corporal William Savage from 2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment Of Scotland (2 SCOTS), Lance Corporal James Brynin of the Intelligence Corps, Warrant Officer Class 2 (WO2) Ian Michael Fisher from The 3rd Battalion, The Mercian Regiment (Staffords), Captain Richard Holloway from The Royal Engineers, Warrant Officer Class 2 (WO2), Sapper Adam Moralee from 32 Engineer Regiment, Captain Thomas Ellis Clarke of the Army Air Corps, Flight Lieutenant Rakesh Chauhan.

Line 46Spencer Faulkner of the Army Air Corps, Corporal James Walters of the Army Air Corps, Lance Corporal Oliver Matthew Thomas of 3 Military Intelligence Battalion.